entrap

  • 141 To lay an ambush — Ambush Am bush ([a^]m b[oo^]sh), n. [F. emb[^u]che, fr. the verb. See {Ambush}, v. t.] 1. A disposition or arrangement of troops for attacking an enemy unexpectedly from a concealed station. Hence: Unseen peril; a device to entrap; a snare. [1913 …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 142 Train — Train, n. [F. train, OF. tra[ i]n, trahin; cf. (for some of the senses) F. traine. See {Train}, v.] 1. That which draws along; especially, persuasion, artifice, or enticement; allurement. [Obs.] Now to my charms, and to my wily trains. Milton.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 143 Train mile — Train Train, n. [F. train, OF. tra[ i]n, trahin; cf. (for some of the senses) F. traine. See {Train}, v.] 1. That which draws along; especially, persuasion, artifice, or enticement; allurement. [Obs.] Now to my charms, and to my wily trains.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 144 Train of artillery — Train Train, n. [F. train, OF. tra[ i]n, trahin; cf. (for some of the senses) F. traine. See {Train}, v.] 1. That which draws along; especially, persuasion, artifice, or enticement; allurement. [Obs.] Now to my charms, and to my wily trains.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 145 Train of mechanism — Train Train, n. [F. train, OF. tra[ i]n, trahin; cf. (for some of the senses) F. traine. See {Train}, v.] 1. That which draws along; especially, persuasion, artifice, or enticement; allurement. [Obs.] Now to my charms, and to my wily trains.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 146 Train of rolls — Train Train, n. [F. train, OF. tra[ i]n, trahin; cf. (for some of the senses) F. traine. See {Train}, v.] 1. That which draws along; especially, persuasion, artifice, or enticement; allurement. [Obs.] Now to my charms, and to my wily trains.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 147 Train road — Train Train, n. [F. train, OF. tra[ i]n, trahin; cf. (for some of the senses) F. traine. See {Train}, v.] 1. That which draws along; especially, persuasion, artifice, or enticement; allurement. [Obs.] Now to my charms, and to my wily trains.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 148 Train tackle — Train Train, n. [F. train, OF. tra[ i]n, trahin; cf. (for some of the senses) F. traine. See {Train}, v.] 1. That which draws along; especially, persuasion, artifice, or enticement; allurement. [Obs.] Now to my charms, and to my wily trains.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 149 Trap — Trap, v. t. [AS. treppan. See {Trap} a snare.] [1913 Webster] 1. To catch in a trap or traps; as, to trap foxes. [1913 Webster] 2. Fig.: To insnare; to take by stratagem; to entrap. I trapped the foe. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 3. To provide with a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 150 Trapan — Tra*pan , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Trapanned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Trapanning}.] To insnare; to catch by stratagem; to entrap; to trepan. [1913 Webster] Having some of his people trapanned at Baldivia. Anson. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 151 Trapanned — Trapan Tra*pan , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Trapanned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Trapanning}.] To insnare; to catch by stratagem; to entrap; to trepan. [1913 Webster] Having some of his people trapanned at Baldivia. Anson. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 152 Trapanning — Trapan Tra*pan , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Trapanned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Trapanning}.] To insnare; to catch by stratagem; to entrap; to trepan. [1913 Webster] Having some of his people trapanned at Baldivia. Anson. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 153 captious — adjective Etymology: Middle English capcious, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French captieux, from Latin captiosus, from captio deception, verbal quibble, from capere to take more at heave Date: 14th century 1. marked by an often ill natured …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 154 engage — verb (engaged; engaging) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French engager, from en + gage pledge, gage Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to offer (as one s word) as security for a debt or cause 2. a. obsolete to entangle or entrap in or… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 155 entoil — transitive verb Date: 1581 entrap, enmesh …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 156 insidious — adjective Etymology: Latin insidiosus, from insidiae ambush, from insidēre to sit in, sit on, from in + sedēre to sit more at sit Date: 1545 1. a. awaiting a chance to entrap ; treacherous b. harmful but enticing ; seductive …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 157 tangle — I. verb (tangled; tangling) Etymology: Middle English tanglen, tagilen, probably short for entanglen, from Anglo French entagler, entangler to prosecute (for), implicate Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to involve so as to hamper, obstruct,… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 158 trap — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English treppe & Anglo French trape (of Germanic origin); akin to Middle Dutch trappe trap, stair, Old English treppan to tread Date: before 12th century 1. a device for taking game or other animals;… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 159 trepan — I. transitive verb (trepanned; trepanning) Etymology: Middle English, from trepane trephine Date: 15th century 1. to use a trephine on (the skull) 2. to remove a disk or cylindrical core (as from metal for testing) • trepanation noun II. noun …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 160 Deprogramming — refers to actions that attempt to force a person to abandon allegiance to a religious, political, economic, or social group. Methods and practices may involve kidnapping and coercion.[1] Similar actions, when done without force, are called exit… …

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